Archive for July 1st, 2010

Is the Postal Service owed $50B or $75B?

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Written by Lisa.Bowes

July 1st, 2010 at 10:55 pm

Posted in USPS

Full Service Intelligent Mail Series – Full Service ACS

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This is the first in a series I will be posting throughout July, having to do with Full Service Intelligent Mail.

First up, things to be aware of regarding Full Service ACS –

Full Service Intelligent Mail users can receive address correction information at no additional charge for mail-class specific lengths of time. Address-correction information includes COA data when a new address is available for the intended recipient and nixie records when the piece is not deliverable at all. Mailers must use the address correction information to update their address records or be subject to charges for subsequent notices.

>DANGER, Proceed with Caution beware PostalOne! Release 25, scheduled for deployment November 2010.  It will provide USPS capabilities to invoice Full-Service mailers who incur charges for Address Correction Services (ACS).

Take note of the word MAILERS, that’s right, the Mailer or Mail Service Provider runs the risk of incurring charges on a process he does not necessarily have direct control of.  What a mailing customer does with their list updates is their business, not the responsibility of the Mail Service Provider.

Standard Mail letters and flats – The Full-Service mailer receives notices of Change of Address (COA) or undeliverable-as-addressed (Nixie) at no additional cost for 95 calendar days from the first notice. On the 96th day after the COA/nixie notice is first made available to the mailer, the mailer may be charged for subsequent notices provided for the same COA record or nixie notice. Compliance with the Move Update standard for Standard Mail mailpieces is required.

First Class Mail letters and flats – The Full-Service mailer receives notices of Change of Address (COA) or undeliverable-as-addressed (Nixie) at no additional cost for an unlimited time period. However, compliance with the Move Update standard for First-Class Mail mailpieces is required.

If payment is not received within 30 days, the account will become delinquent. Full-Service ACS feedback will be suspended on delinquent accounts, and unpaid balances will be subject to a 10% annual interest rate. If multiple MIDs are linked to a delinquent CRID, ACS feedback is suspended for all of those MIDs.

Pro
>limited Free ACS information – any tools that help reduce Undeliverable As Addressed mail are on the right track

Cons
>Costly, time-consuming Full Service compliance issues
>Low to nonexistence tolerance thresholds for compliance
>No Full Service ACS on Enhanced Carrier Route Flats or non-automation qualified pieces
>Managing ACS billing and reporting when fulfillment is no longer under the free charge
>Mail Service Provider has to assume responsibility for maintaining and billing ACS back to actual ACS client
>On Standard Mail, the list owner loses their right to choose whether or not to take an address off a list
>For Full-Service ACS, the electronic record formats are different from those of both OneCode ACS and traditional ACS, the information comes to the customer by a selection of different electronic channels
>Do YOU cut off your good customers if a payment is more than 30 days late?  In this case, it could very well be a charge of fifty bucks shutting down ACS.  And the shutdown applies to multiple customers, not just the one in arrears!
>The new path the USPS seems to be on, where they view and try to utilize penalties as a revenue stream rather than a corrective action is possibly the biggest con of all.  In more ways than one.

Written by Lisa.Bowes

July 1st, 2010 at 12:44 pm

Posted in USPS

Why did the USPS hire Bernstock in the first place?

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Written by Lisa.Bowes

July 1st, 2010 at 11:36 am

Posted in USPS